RHCSA 8 Exam Practice Question 6 (Storage Management In Linux)

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RHCSA 8 Exam practice question 6

Question

Create a 512M partition, make it as ext4 file system, mounted automatically under /mnt/data and which take effect automatically at boot-start.

The question is based On Storage Management In Linux in The RHCSA 8 Course on this website. If you have gone through this course, solving this wouldn’t be a problem.

RHCSA, 8 Course

Storage Management In Linux

Storage Management In Linux (LVM In Linux)

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Solution

1 verify the disks on the server,

NOTE: If a disk is specified in the Exam, use the disk

[root@lab02 ~]# lsblk

NAME              MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda                 8:0    0  32G  0 disk
├─sda1              8:1    0   1G  0 part /boot
└─sda2              8:2    0  31G  0 part
  ├─rootvg-tmplv  253:0    0   2G  0 lvm  /tmp
  ├─rootvg-usrlv  253:1    0  10G  0 lvm  /usr
  ├─rootvg-optlv  253:2    0   2G  0 lvm  /opt
  ├─rootvg-homelv 253:3    0   1G  0 lvm  /home
  ├─rootvg-varlv  253:4    0   8G  0 lvm  /var
  └─rootvg-rootlv 253:5    0   8G  0 lvm  /
sdb                 8:16   0  20G  0 disk
└─sdb1              8:17   0  20G  0 part /mnt
sdc                 8:32   0  32G  0 disk
[root@lab02 ~]#

2. create a 512M partition on sdc

[root@lab02 ~]# fdisk /dev/sdc

Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.32.1).
Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
Be careful before using the write command.

Device does not contain a recognized partition table.
Created a new DOS disklabel with disk identifier 0xfe6d09dd.

Command (m for help): n
Partition type
   p   primary (0 primary, 0 extended, 4 free)
   e   extended (container for logical partitions)
Select (default p): p
Partition number (1-4, default 1):
First sector (2048-67108863, default 2048):
Last sector, +sectors or +size{K,M,G,T,P} (2048-67108863, default 67108863): +512M

Created a new partition 1 of type 'Linux' and of size 512 MiB.

Command (m for help): p
Disk /dev/sdc: 32 GiB, 34359738368 bytes, 67108864 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xfe6d09dd

Device     Boot Start     End Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sdc1        2048 1050623 1048576  512M 83 Linux

Command (m for help): w
The partition table has been altered.
Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table.
Syncing disks.

[root@lab02 ~]#

3. verify if the partition has been created.

[root@lab02 ~]# lsblk

NAME              MAJ:MIN RM  SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
sda                 8:0    0   32G  0 disk
├─sda1              8:1    0    1G  0 part /boot
└─sda2              8:2    0   31G  0 part
  ├─rootvg-tmplv  253:0    0    2G  0 lvm  /tmp
  ├─rootvg-usrlv  253:1    0   10G  0 lvm  /usr
  ├─rootvg-optlv  253:2    0    2G  0 lvm  /opt
  ├─rootvg-homelv 253:3    0    1G  0 lvm  /home
  ├─rootvg-varlv  253:4    0    8G  0 lvm  /var
  └─rootvg-rootlv 253:5    0    8G  0 lvm  /
sdb                 8:16   0   20G  0 disk
└─sdb1              8:17   0   20G  0 part /mnt
sdc                 8:32   0   32G  0 disk
└─sdc1              8:33   0  512M  0 part
[root@lab02 ~]#

4. Format the volume to ext4

[root@lab02 ~]# mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdc1

mke2fs 1.44.3 (10-July-2018)
Discarding device blocks: done
Creating filesystem with 131072 4k blocks and 32768 inodes
Filesystem UUID: 8383ef24-a910-4829-ae81-6898b95102a9
Superblock backups stored on blocks:
        32768, 98304

Allocating group tables: done
Writing inode tables: done
Creating journal (4096 blocks): done
Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done

[root@lab02 ~]#

5. verify it’s been formatted to ext4

[root@lab02 ~]# blkid |grep /dev/sdc1

/dev/sdc1: UUID="8383ef24-a910-4829-ae81-6898b95102a9" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="fe6d09dd-01"

6. create a mount point, /mnt/data

[root@lab02 ~]# mkdir /mnt/data
[root@lab02 ~]#

7. map the partition to the mount point.

[root@lab02 ~]# mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt/data
[root@lab02 ~]#

8. verify it’s been mounted

[root@lab02 ~]# df -h

Filesystem                 Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
devtmpfs                   2.0G     0  2.0G   0% /dev
tmpfs                      2.0G     0  2.0G   0% /dev/shm
tmpfs                      2.0G  8.6M  2.0G   1% /run
tmpfs                      2.0G     0  2.0G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/mapper/rootvg-rootlv  7.9G   61M  7.4G   1% /
/dev/mapper/rootvg-usrlv   9.8G  1.5G  7.9G  16% /usr
/dev/mapper/rootvg-homelv  976M  2.8M  906M   1% /home
/dev/mapper/rootvg-optlv   2.0G  6.0M  1.8G   1% /opt
/dev/sda1                  976M   92M  817M  11% /boot
/dev/mapper/rootvg-varlv   7.9G  248M  7.2G   4% /var
/dev/mapper/rootvg-tmplv   2.0G  6.1M  1.8G   1% /tmp
/dev/sdb1                   20G   45M   19G   1% /mnt
tmpfs                      392M     0  392M   0% /run/user/0
/dev/sdc1                  488M  780K  452M   1% /mnt/data

9. Edit the fstab file to make it persistent (take effect automatically at boot-start)

[root@lab02 ~]# vim /etc/fstab
[root@lab02 ~]#
RHCSA 8 exam practice question 6

10. Do a mount all to verify the fstab file is correctly inputted

[root@lab02 ~]# mount -a
[root@lab02 ~]#

11. Reboot.

Note: One thing you will always want to do in the RHCSA exam is to reboot as many times as possible to confirm that your system is okay. It’s very important. If your system doesn’t come up after solving all your questions, you will score a FAT zero

Solution Summary

lsblk

fdisk /dev/sdc

lsblk

mkdir.ext4 /dev/sdc1

blkid |grep /dev/sdc1

mkdir /mnt/data

mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt/data

df -h

vim /etc/fstab

mount -a

reboot

You can also watch the Video on RHCSA 8 Exam Practice Question 6 by clicking the link below.

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2 Comments

  1. Hi, I noticed many typo’s in some answers in different Q’s, in this “mkdir.ext4”, I think should be mkfs.ext4? And is there a reason why in the fstab all FS’s are mounted with options 1 2 and not just 0 0?

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